Weekly Swim Session Plan 12 November 2019 – Session Plan 200

Download and print the session plan here: session plan 200

This week, we work on endurance with 200m reps, and a nod to the 200th Swim session plan!

Warm Up:

2 x 100m, the first easy, the second, steady.

Technical set:

200m doggy paddle up, swim back

Main set:

6 – 10 X 200m repetitions (Rest 20s – 60s depending upon fitness / ability)

Warm down:

100m – 200m   Easy to very easy

Total Volume:

1700m – 2600m

Coaching Points:

See Paul Newsome’s doggy paddle demonstration in the video below.

Set out at a fairly relaxed pace on your 200m reps and gradually build into your session.  Success might be similar times for every 200m repetition, rather than starting fast and fading toward the end.

Weekly Swim Session Plan 29 October 2019 – Session Plan 199

Download and print this session plan here: session plan 199

This week, we are keeping it simple, stupid.  Back to volume to help build some endurance, with the simplest of session designs, using the rest interval as the variable between novice swimmers and the more experienced / capable.

Warm Up:

2 x 100m, the first easy, the second, steady.

Technical set:

100m kick with, or without kickboard 4 x 25m

Main set:

100m repetitions (Rest 10s – 30s depending upon fitness / ability)

Warm down:

100m – 200m   Easy to very easy

Total Volume:

1800m – 3500m

Coaching Points:

During the kicking drill, keep the legs relatively straight and kick from the hips, engaging glutes and hip flexors.

Time your 100s and track your pace throughout the session. As with any endurance swim, don’t go out too hard, or the latter part of the session will become extremely tough.  Observe the selected rest period and remain consistent throughout.

Weekly Swim Session Plan 22 October 2019 – Plan 198

Download and print the session plan here: session plan 198

This week, we’ll work on front of the stroke, ensuring a high elbow catch is achieved.  Locating the elbow near the water’s surface, during the catch, is a great way to assure an effective pull, leading to better propulsion and more swim speed.  Who doesn’t want that?

Warm Up:

2 x 100m, the first easy, the second, building in effort.

Technical set:

2 x 50m kick with, or without kickboard

4 x 50m 1 finger drill going up, full hand swimming coming back (feel the pressure on your palm)

4 x 50m long doggy paddle going up the pool, swim back (visually check for a high elbow catch)

Main set:

15-20 x 50m, swimming with moderate effort but focusing on maintaining a high elbow catch

Warm down:

100m – 200m   Easy to very easy

Total Volume:

1550m – 1900m

Coaching Points:

Don’t rush the drills, or the main set. Feel how your hand resists the water, creating a lever against which you can pull yourself through the water.  Visually check that the elbow stays high and perhaps use the notion that your elbows ‘float’ to the surface, before pulling.

Let’s see what Dave Scott has to say about what he calls a “high elbow set”:

 

Weekly Swim Session Plan 15 October 2019 – Plan 197

Download and print this session plan here: session plan 197

The recovery pathway is the part of the stroke that is seen first by most other swimmers.  While there are many possible variants, setting your arm for hand entry and catch is essential for underwater success.

Warm Up:

200m as 100m easy pace, 100m building pace

Technical set:

4 x 50m, as super-slow swimming (pause in the rotated position, just before hand entry)

2 x 50m easy swimming, focusing on good body rotation but holding balance (don’t over-rotate)

4 x 50m as finger-trail drill going up the pool, swim back ensuring the recovering arm is relaxed and entering directly in front of the shoulder

Main set:

4 – 8 x 100m maintain focus on body rotation and a relaxed arm recovery

Warm down:

200m easy – feel how easily you’re moving through the water.

Total Volume:

1300 – 1700m

Coaching Points:

If you’re too flat on the water, you’ll be unable to recover your arm effectively.  Opening up the body rotation to both left and right, whether breathing, or not, to around 45° will free your shoulder and allow an effective arm recovery.

Think about lifting your elbow and pushing it forward, allowing the forearm to follow, rather than reaching with your hand – this may help prevent centerline crossing.

Watch what Dave Scott says in this instructional video:

Weekly Swim Session Plan 8 October 2019 Plan 196

Download and print this Session plan here: session plan 196

Having set up an effective catch over the last couple of weeks, this week, we’ll shift our focus back, through the stroke cycle, to the pull pathway. This is a really short session, allowing you to really focus on what’s happening under the water. We’ll support the technical set with more great advice from 6 X Ironman World Champion – The Man – Dave Scott.

Warm Up:

200m easy pace

Technical set:

3 x 50m long doggy paddle going up the pool, swim back (review coaching points for hand position)

3 x 50m easy swimming, implementing the pull pathway practiced during the drill

3 x 50m with technique paddles, or 1-finger drill going up the pool, swim back

Main set:

4 – 8 x 100m maintain focus on a straight pull pathway and correct hand alignment

Warm down:

200m easy – feel how easily you’re moving through the water.

Total Volume:

1250 – 1650m

Coaching Points:

During doggy paddle and freestyle, set the catch with a high elbow, keep the hand and forearm neutral, with fingertips pointing toward the bottom of the pool.  I particularly like Dave’s paint brush analogy – check it out.

Watch what Dave Scott says in this instructional video:

Weekly Swim Session Plan 1 October 2019 – Session 195

Download and print the session plan Here

This week, we are going to continue to focus on an effective catch, with more great advice from 6 X Ironman World Champion – The Man – Dave Scott.

Warm Up:

200m easy pace

Technical set:

4 x 50m Alternating arm half-pull with under water recovery (short doggy-paddle drill)

4 x 50m Alternating arm pull / push full stroke, keeping the elbow high in the water on the front of the stroke

4 x 50m 1-finger drill going up the pool, full hand when swimming back. Feel the resistance when the full hand is utilised – keep the elbow high at the front end.

Main set:

4 – 6 x 200m maintain focus on setting a high-elbow catch.  Initially, your stroke may feel slow and mechanical.  Try to maintain the high elbow catch but smooth out the stroke as the set progresses.

Warm down:

200m easy – feel how easily you’re moving through the water.

Total Volume:

1800 – 2200m

Coaching Points:

High elbow catch may feel strange at first, if you’re used to dropping your arm. Stick with it, it will be transformational for your swimming.

Watch what Dave Scott says in this instructional video:

The Weekly Session Plans Return!

After a hiatus of almost a year, by moderately popular demand, the weekly swim session plans are back.

Download and print this session plan here: session plan 193

We’ll focus on technique sessions to take us through to 2020.  This week, we are going to start at the very front of the stroke, hand entry, while drawing on some great advice from 6 X Ironman World Champion – The Man – Dave Scott.

Warm Up:

200m as 100 easy, 100 build

Technical set:

6 x 50m Swim with focus on the middle finger of the leading hand, pointing straight forward at the end-wall (not down, inward, or outward) Take 15 seconds of reflection and re-focus after each

6 x 50m Swim with technique paddles (if you have them) or use 1-finger drill going up the pool, full hand when swimming back. Assess whether your leading hand is straight out. 15 sec rest after each.

Main set:

4 – 6 x 200m maintain focus on hand entry alignment – re-perform drills between sets if required.

Warm down:

200m easy – feel how easily you’re moving through the water.

Total Volume:

1800 – 2200m

Coaching Points:

Enter finger-tips first and reach forward, ensuring the middle finger is pointing straight at the end wall, before forming your high-elbow catch.

Watch what Dave Scott says in this instructional video: